In Love With Writing

While reading Edith Wharton’s memoir, A Backward Glance, I came across a description

of another writer that blazed from the page.  She wrote of Joseph Conrad that “…he had

worshiped the English language all his life like a lover.”

As I read these words, I was struck by the passion of her imagery.  Of course, Edith

Wharton’s entire life was devoted to the English language from the time when she first

discovered  hundreds of leather bound books in her father’s library.  She went on to become a

distinguished novelist whose books limned the manners and mores of her day. The Age of

Innocence brought her the Pulitzer Prize; Ethan Frome, the ironic novella of life in a small

New England town,  appears on reading lists in many of our high schools.

I remember in eighth grade when we were first introduced by our English teacher to the

technique of ‘diagraming’ a sentence.  First, we had to separate each word as to the particular

part of speech: noun, verb, adjective, adverb, preposition, article.  Then, out came the rulers to

draw a graphic design of the sentence.  The straight line and placement of the subject and

predicate.  Once these essentials were in place, we had to position the object. And then the many

diagonal lines for the modifiers and the phrases.

We started with simple sentences and progressed to more complex ones.  I must confess

that I was probably the only one in the class who appeared to enjoy this entire endeavor. There

was something about the order and symmetry of the design that I found profoundly satisfying.

Every word had a place in relation to every other word.  It all could be broken down and put back

together again.  Voila!  The structure of the sentence was revealed in its purest form.

In high school, when I studied Latin, the appeal was the same. To take the sentence

apart — finding the verbs,  nouns and modifiers. Then, reconstructing the sentence in English.

It was a puzzle that could be deciphered in measured steps.  And it served to heighten my

appreciation for the order of the English language as well. Some said that was the main reason to

study Latin, labeled a ‘dead language’. But I always felt it had intrinsic worth in itself. My

mother, the only person I knew who had studied Latin for eight years and Greek for seven,

agreed.  She was a wise woman in many ways, one of which was to value the Classics.

Many decades later, as I write this column, I still retain the wonder and love for the

beauty and majesty of the English language.  And I still have a lot to learn.

In the year 2000, when I began the interviews and writing that led to my first book,

Courage In High Heels, I was embarking in a new direction.  Writing articles for newspapers

and magazines for over twenty years was a different pursuit from writing a book.  Both, of

course, require the disciplined use of the language.   I like the term, ‘wordsmith’ as a descriptor

— a writer molds words  as a sculptor shapes the clay and a silversmith works with the precious

metal.

During the interviews with the eight women who gave me their life stories for Courage

In High Heels, I learned that their words were the heart of their stories. In an atmosphere where

trust was essential, they told me with candor and honesty  what they had thought and felt during

the skein of events that threaded through their lives.  They each had overcome formidable

obstacles in life with amazing spirit and resilience. Yet each woman had dealt with life in

an individual way. The words that they shared with me were very powerful and I used them liberally in each story. I call their quotes —  the “juices of the book”.

After completing my first book, there was the daunting task of finding a publisher.

Twenty proposals were out at all times to prospective agents and/or editors, in a process called

simultaneous submission.  During the two and a half years before the book was accepted for

publication, I embarked on a wonderful new romance with the English language — writing

fiction.  I found it exhilarating to create the characters and their ever evolving lives — the twists,

the conflicts, the drama in human relationships. I became totally engrossed in the writing.

The first novel, Flaw In The Tapestry, will be in print within the next six months.  If

Winter Comes and The Mermaids Singing are also completed and waiting in the wings.   All

three are indeed the fruits of a long and continuing love affair with the English language.

As my mother often said — onward!

 

 

Kimchi Family: Jewish Literary History

Our family had ancestors who wrote in the 19th and 20th centuries.  They can be found on Wikipedia under the Title above with pictures and books they wrote.  It is fascinating to explore.  Take a look.

When my sister, Shirley Sloan Fader went to Israel with her husband Seymour to live after the State of Israel was born, they met several  Kimchis who were writers.

It is fascinating to trace the probability that writing genes have been passed from generation to generation in our family.  Here goes:

Shirley and I were the daughters of Miriam Marcus Sloan.  Her mother was Hannah KIMCHI Marcus.  She had come to America with her father in about 1890 from Poland.  He didn’t   like it here and then went to Palestine.  She said, “I like it here.  I’m staying.”  Lucky for all of us, she was very independent and beautiful.  She was courted in the Lower East Side of New York by a German Jewish Doctor whose last name was Marcus.

They had three daughters, Deborah, Rose and Miriam. Deborah and Miriam were early scholars and loved to write.  They both went to Hunter College , free in those days, and studied many languages: Latin, Greek, Old English, Hebrew of course, French, German .  In later years, Miriam learned Braille to teach on a volunteer basis to classes for l7 years of her later life. She and her students sent books to The Library of Congress in Washington.

Deborah wrote “The Three Pillars”, the book given by The Theological Seminary to Jewish brides on their weddings for decades. The pillars were Thought. Worship. Practice. Deborah was also the Supervisor of Languages in Elizabeth , New Jersey where they lived.  Once a year she gave a lecture in Latin. She married a Sephardic Rabbi, Raphael Melamed.

Miriam married Samuel Louis Sloan, a doctor who opened his practice in Paterson , New Jersey.  My sister and I both loved to write.  Shirley became what was known as a three name lady writer.  Shirley Sloan Fader.   Her books are  in my library.  She wrote articles and books for children and adults.  “The Princess Who Grew Down”  , “From Kitchen to Career”  and “Jobmanship”  under a man’s name S. R. Redford.  ( The initials were for Shirley Ruth )

I started writing books after writing a weekly column for 15 years in Jewish Times, “ Dimensions” on Social and Political aspects of current life.  My first book, “Courage in High Heels”, published in 2003 became my bestseller.  My novels: “Flaw in The Tapestry” was followed by a sequel, “If Winter Comes”.  “The Mermaids Singing”  led to “The Critical Eye”, a collection of my articles on American life style and culture that have been published in newspapers and magazines over the years.

It appears that some of the original Kimchi genes from the European and Palestine Kimchi writers are appearing in my children and their children.   How delightful to contemplate this genetic progression.

Steven and David write as an integral part of their professional positions.  Steve is managing partner of the law firm he founded in New York City. Dave is a Senior Executive at the Washington Center in D.C.  He was  the editor of  “‘Leverage” and contributes Op Ed columns to The Hill, Baltimore Sun and other major publications. Faith has used her writing skills to build a solid career in the corporate business world where reports, and analyses are required in many aspects of the positions she has held.

Next Generation:   Steven & Lauren’s son Jason has a degree in English and has written a novel as well as several TV or Movie scripts.   David and Adrienne’s daughter Eden is aimed at a career in Design where she will edit and create in writing and pictures.  Faith’s daughter Jennifer matched writing skills to her art work  in college years.  She is currently  preparing Power Point presentations for a New York Doctor who gives lectures around the world on complex medical subjects.  Jen does the writing.

It seems to me the proud grandmother that all three of the next generation are displaying Kimchi genes to advantage.  Fantastic!

………………………………………………………………………………………Joyce S. Anderson

 

Alert:William Barr Preparing a Report to Blow up The Impeachment Inquiry!

 

Daily Kos has released a detailed account of what The Attorney General  has been doing as he races around the world.  He proved he was the president’s lawyer rather than the people’s lawyer when he gave his four page summary of the Mueller Report’s 400 plus pages.  For the past months, he has visited many countries seeking ways to build Donald Trump’s reputation and denigrate The Impeachment Inquiry and The Democrats.

Recommend:  Read Daily Kos 11/18/19 posting on your computer.   Full account of Barr’s actions , plans and Republicans cooperation in this scheme.

………………………………………..Joyce S. Anderson

 

Public Impeachment Hearings and Fireside Chats

Prologue :  The Impeachment Inquiry moved into a second phase with a vote in The House of Representatives on Thursday, October 31.  The subject was new Rules for the Inquiry that gave the president and his lawyers a role to participate that was not offered in the Nixon and Clinton impeachments.  The result was 232 Democrats (minus 2)  in favor and 196 Republicans against. New York Times banner headline: “Fractured House Backs Impeachment Inquiry”

On Friday, White House Press Secretary Stephanie Grisham spoke about a potential impeachment, saying “ I wouldn’t say it’s a foregone conclusion. I would say that we‘re expecting it.”  On Thursday, Trump, while giving an interview to The Washington Examiner,  had suggested he might read the transcript from his call to Ukraine’s president as “a fireside chat”  (ala FDR) on live television because people have to hear it.”

This vote followed weeks of former public officials defying subpoenas from the White House and testifying under oath before The House Intelligence Committee. They spoke about the phone call Trump made to President Zelensky of Ukraine asking for a “favor”
in return for allowing millions of dollars in aid that had been passed by Congress to be sent.  The favor was to investigate Joe Biden and his son Hunter for illegal activity in Ukraine.  Trump had put a hold on that aid earlier.

Possible Articles of Impeachment:

First, consider his Oath of Office and then weigh his actions, speech and behavior during almost three years as president.

Oath of office: “I do solemnly swear that I will faithfully execute the Office of President of the United States , and will to the best of my Ability, preserve, protect and defend the Constitution of the United States.”

 

Article One of ImpeachmentBetrayal of The United States Constitution.

The Emoluments clause of The Constitution in Article I, Section 9 prohibits the President “without the consent of Congress”  from accepting “any present, Emolument, Office or Title of any kind from a King, Prince or Foreign State.”

Donald Trump failed to divest himself of his business interests in the United States and other countries on assuming the presidency as all former presidents have done. Thus, he has reaped millions of dollars at the Trump International Hotel in Washington from foreign officials who visit the White House ,  as well as his other hotels and sports locations in foreign countries.

He has also had his lawyers block releasing his tax returns to avoid a public record of the millions he has made while in office.

 

Article Two: Abuse of Power

President Trump called President Zelensky of Ukraine and offered Javelin missiles to protect against Russian tanks only if he would do “a favor”.  The favor was to investigate former Vice President Biden and his son Hunter for illegal business dealings. A whistle blower revealed this telephone call that developed into a major White House scandal.   It was labeled a “shake down”  and a form of corruption to ask a foreign president to interfere in our political system.

 

Article Three : Obstruction of Justice

The Mueller Report , Volume 2, lists seven examples of Donald Trump’s Obstruction of Justice. They were highlighted in blocks on the front page of The New York Times after the 400 plus pages were finally made public.  April 19, 2019.

Example six: “Congress may apply the obstruction laws to the president’s corrupt use of the powers of office accords with our constitutional system of checks and balances that no person is above the law.”

Epilogue:  Article II, Section 4 of The Constitution was part of the original document written in l787.  “The President, Vice President and all Civil Officers of the United States shall be removed from office on Impeachment for and Conviction of Treason, Bribery and other high Crimes and Misdemeanors.”

They had fought the revolution against King George and they wanted to make sure this final section of Article  II, The Executive, gave Congress the responsibility of removal from office on Impeachment and Conviction.

A famous anecdote describes Benjamin Franklin emerging from the building in Philadelphia where The Constitution was signed. He was  asked a question by one of the women in the crowd, “Dr. Franklin, do we have a monarchy or a republic?”  His reply was quoted by Speaker Pelosi after the House vote on Impeachment Rules was passed.  “A Republic…. If you can keep it. “

…………………………………………Joyce S.  Anderson

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

After Ellis Island

 

Prologue: Immigrants have been a major emphasis during Donald Trump’s first years in office. A series of administration travel bans have been halted by Federal Judges.  The president continues to promise to build “The Wall” to stop immigration from Mexico and Central American countries. Trump sees immigrants as a threat to the nation, especially Muslims and Hispanics. What a contrast with President John F. Kennedy who wrote , “A Nation of Immigrants”.

One of the most interesting immigrant experience that my husband and I have taken part in was when we visited the Lower East Side Tenement Museum in New York City some years ago. It was a travel back in time to the years when immigrants were welcomed into our country from nations all over the globe.

……………………………………………………………………………………………………

Where did the immigrants go, once they passed the stern uniformed inspectors, the daunting tests and disembarked onto the dock in New York Harbor? How did they live — this generation that Oscar Handlin described so brilliantly in his Pulitzer Prize winning book, The Uprooted ?  What was the quality of their lives?

The immigrants were risk takers, leaving generations of ancestors behind them to venture over thousands of miles of ocean into a completely new life. Of the 12 million immigrants who came through Ellis Island, 8 million left the area with destinations pinned to their lapels. They climbed aboard trains and traveled to distant places across the country on the huge network of railroads. However, by 1900, most of the newcomers settled in four industrial states: New York, Pennsylvania, Massachusetts and Illinois. In New York City, they lived in ethnic enclaves on the Lower East Side. For the surge of eastern and southern European immigrants, the crowded tenements were a vast change from the villages they left behind in Belarus, Ukraine, Poland or Italy.

 

Today, at 90 Orchard Street on the corner of Broome Street in New York City, you can visit the Lower East Side Tenement Museum and enter the world of your ancestors who came and settled there. It is a fascinating and very personal experience to move with the tour guide through the building that was one of the actual tenements where immigrants lived. To walk into a cramped, dark three room apartment of 300 square feet and hear the history of the family who ate, slept and often worked there.

In 1920, Lazarus Salamon, A Hungarian immigrant wrote, “I feel like I had two lives. You plant something in the ground. It has its roots, and then, you transplant it where it stays permanently. That’s what happened to me.”

In a strange city, with streets jam-packed with pushcarts and trolley cars, the immigrants had to learn fast. Where to find work? Where to go to the butcher? Where to send the children to school? There was little time for contemplation or leisure. Each day brought new challenges and problems to solve. New questions to be answered. New hardships.  And of course, a new language to learn. The children who went to school learned the fastest and became interpreters for their parents.

“It was very, very different and very peculiar. We looked around and didn’t know what it was all about. A different world with different people. And it’s hard to adjust.” Helen Wolraich, a Polish immigrant, 1920.

At the Lower East Side Tenement Museum, three different tours bring the past to life. “Piecing It Together: Immigrants in the Garment Industry” takes you to two apartments, the Levine family in l897 who ran a garment shop in their home and the Rogarshevskys who are in mourning for their father, Abraham, who worked as a presser in a factory before succumbing to tuberculosis in l918. Almost every generation of immigrants to the Lower East Side had some connection to the garment industry.

A second tour, “Getting By: Immigrants Weather The Great Depressions of l873 and 1929” centers on the homes of the German-Jewish Gumpertz family (l870’s) and the Sicilian-Catholic Baldizzi family (1930’s). How they found work during hard times is vividly told as you stand and absorb their furnishings and treasured possessions brought from the old country. A tape by one of the descendants tells the personal story of each family. And the pictures, the faces looking out over the years are very powerful.

“My mother brought her candles, the ones you use on Friday nights. She brought her Bibles. She brought the things that were near and dear to us which were not very important to anybody but us. To us, they brought back memories.” Sam Auspitz, a Czechloslovakian immigrant, 1920.

A third tour is to the  “Confino family Apartment”, the recreated 1916 home of a Sephardic family from Kastoria. A costumed guide acting as Victoria Confino welcomes you and invites you to touch items, try on period clothing and dance to music played on a wind-up victrola. The museum describes this tour as “ perfect for families”. Children are welcomed on all the tours which run approximately one hour. There is also a walking tour, “The Streets Where We Lived.”

“Most dear to me are the shoes my mother wore when she first set foot on the soil of America. You must see those shoes to appreciate the courage my parents had and the sacrifices they made giving up family and security to try for a better life, but not knowing what lay ahead. We came to this country as many others did. POOR!  My mother’s shoes tell the whole story.”

Birgitta Hedman Fichter, a Swedish immigrant in 1924.

Visit the Lower East Side Tenement Museum. Take your children. It’s a very human experience. And it tells an inspiring story of “ The Uprooted” and the new life  they made here in America — for us.  Museum hours are Monday through Sunday, 11 a.m. to 5:30 p.m. For information  and reservations for all tours, phone 1-212-431-0233. Fax 212-431-0402.  Website: www.tenement.org

 

…………………………………………….Joyce S. Anderson

 

 

Trump Pulls Troops From Syria and Deserts The Kurds

Prologue: Monday, October 7, 2019 began a wild week seen in headlines from The New York Times:

October 8, 2019, “Backtracking on Syria, President Mixes Signals, Inciting G.O.P. fury.”

October 10, 2019: “Turkey Attacks U.S. Ally in Syria”

October 14, 2019: “Syrian Forces Rush Into U.S. Void”

History:  United States policy under Presidents Obama and Bush has been to destroy ISIS in the Middle East.  The Kurds have been allies of U. S. troops in the region for years in this ongoing struggle.  When Trump was elected, he did not support this policy.  He had said he would stop “endless wars” which cost millions and vowed to pull our troops from Syria.  Secretary of Defense James Mattis strongly disagreed with this and resigned his position.

Trump Moves to Leave Syria:  On Sunday, October 6 in a White House Statement, Trump said it was time “ for us to get out” and let others “figure the situation out”.  On Monday, October 7, he met with senior military leaders  at the White  House  while Republicans in Congress angrily attacked his decision. They had supported U.S. troops fighting Isis as had most Democrats.  Senator Lindsay Graham,  Republican Chair of the Senate Foreign Relations Committee, finally took a stand against Trump on this issue.  He said, “It was the most screwed up decision I’ve  ever seen in all my years in Congress.”

Our Allies overseas spoke out strongly against our withdrawal from the battle against Isis. They warned  that Turkey would be ready to move into the region and destroy the Kurds , considered their enemy.  The Kurds actually had 800 ISIS fighters and their families in a prison camp.

Trump heard them and said he would restrain Turkey. Here is his exact statement written on Twitter: “As I have stated strongly before, and just to reiterate,  If Turkey does anything that I, in my great and unmatched wisdom, consider to be off limits, I will totally destroy the economy of Turkey. (I’ve done before.”)

On October 9, he wrote a letter to   President Erdogan of Turkey which ended with “ Don’t be a tough guy.  Don’t be a fool. “   At the bottom was a note, “ I’ll call you later. “

Turkish troops enter Syria on Wednesday, October 9.

They launched an air and  ground attack against a Syrian Kurdish militia that had been fighting ISIS.  Trump called the assault  “a Bad Idea”.  He had talked by telephone with the Turkish president on Sunday, agreeing to move American troops out despite opposition from the State Department and his own military leaders.

Tuesday, October 15: NYT Headline: “Syrian Forces Rush Into  U.S. Void”     President al-Assad of Syria, considered a war criminal by the U.S. moved in to protect the Kurdish Militia.  Middle East analysts say that United States Troops leaving will also benefit Russia and Iran.

Thursday, October 17:”New York Times: ‘ President Digs in on Syria Pullout As House Revolts”

Richard Engel,  MSNBC in Syria, reported on TV that the Kurds were leaving their homes and walking away from the Turkish attacks along the Northern border.   President Erdogan of Turkey was talking about “ethnic cleansing”  of the Kurds a long time enemy.

In The United States,  president Trump was attending a rally where he said “The Kurds are no angels”… without explaining  why he used that label.  They had lost over ten thousand troops fighting   ISIS to support U.S. troops. It appears Trump had been told an unsupported story that the Kurds killed Christians!

At the White House, the next day, he said, “ That has nothing to do with us.  What does that have to do with us if they’re fighting over Syria’s land?”    When pressed by reporters, he said, “I campaigned on a platform   of “ending endless wars”.   “let them fight their own wars. They’ve been fighting for a thousand years.”

In Congress, The House of Representatives took action with a bipartisan vote rebuking Trump for his approval of Turkey attacking the Kurds in Syria.  129 Republicans joined the Democrats.  This was a significant number; only 60 did not sign.

In the Senate,  Mitch McConnell, Majority leader opened his weekly news conference, by “expressing his gratitude to the Kurds”.  He added, “I’m sorry we are where we are.”  Senator Lindsey Graham wrote on Twitter, “I hope President Trump is right in his belief that Turkey’s invasion of Syria is of no concern to us,  abandoning  the Kurds won’t came back to haunt us, ISIS will reemerge and Iran will fill the vacuum created by this decision. “

Trump decides to send Vice President Pence and Secretary of State Pompeo to Turkey to talk with Erdogan.   The result of their meeting is a Cease Fire Declaration of five days.

October 16, 2019 White  House Meeting between President Trump, Speaker of the House Pelosi,  Minority Leader Schumer and leading Congressional Democratic and Republican members.

The meeting took place in The Cabinet Room at a very long table.  Military leaders sat on the President’s right, including the Head of Joint Chiefs of Staff.  Other officials sat on his left.  Directly across from Trump was Nancy Pelosi.  The picture that accompanied this story in The New York Times shows Pelosi standing and pointing at Trump who looks very displeased.  The three generals are all looking down and have their hands tightly clasped; they appear to be ashamed of what they are hearing from the president about the furor over Syria.

When the picture was enlarged on TV during the day , it was clear that Trump looked very unhappy .  One reporter commented, “Years from now, when that photo is shown it will be clear who is in charge of that meeting.”

Trump opened the meeting by saying to the Congressional members, “They said you wanted this meeting.  I didn’t want this meeting.”  Then he began a speech about   a “nasty” letter he had sent to President Erdogan of Turkey.  He directed Kevin Mc Carthy, Minority leader to pass out copies to everyone at the table.  It began “ Let’s work out a good deal”  and ending with “Don’t be a tough guy.  Don’t be a fool.”

A short time later, Pelosi told the president that The House had passed a bipartisan resolution with overwhelming Republican support that condemned his agreement to a Turkish assault against the Kurds who had been crucial American allies in the fight against ISIS.

She was followed by Schumer who appealed to Trump as a fellow New Yorker who had lived through 9/11.  He spoke of terrorism and  ISIS and cited “Someone no less than General Mattis has said that ISIS had been enhanced .” At the mention of Mattis, who had quit last year as Defense Secretary over Trump’s decision to pull troops out of Syria,  the president began denigrating the retired four-star general’s approach to combating terrorism in the Middle East. Mr. Mattis was “the world’s most overrated general,” he said.  “He wasn’t tough enough.  I captured ISIS.  Mattis said it would take two years.  I captured them in one month.”

The ensuing back and forth between Pelosi, who had stood and pointed her finger at Trump as she spoke, went down hill rapidly from there. She was sitting when  Democratic officials described  “a fever pitch”.  Pelosi told the president that Russia  always wanting a foothold in the Middle East has stepped in to fill the void left by American troops in Syria.  At this point, she told Trump,  “All roads with him led to Putin.”

Then Trump said,  I care more about defeating terrorism than  you do.  I hate ISIS more than you do.”   Pelosi replied , “You don’t know that.”

Finally, the president said to the speaker, “You’re just a politician.”   She replied,  “Sometimes, I wish you were.” Schumer interjected,  telling Trump that name-calling was not necessary. “Is that a bad name, Chuck? Then he looked at Pelosi and said, “You’re not a politician.  You’re a third grade politician. “

At that insult, Pelosi prepared to leave . Steny Hoyer said it was time to go and added,  “This is not  useful” as they reached the door.    Trump responded, “Good Bye.  We’ll see you at the polls.”

The White House official account of the meeting was that “The president was measured, factual and decisive while Speaker Pelosi’s decision to walk out was baffling but not surprising.”

The speaker described the president’s behavior as “a meltdown”.

Epilogue:   The final outcome of the United States betrayal of the Kurds is that the territory that was their homeland   will be split in two.  The Northern half  will become a part of Turkey and the Southern half becomes a part of Syria.

……………………………………………. .Joyce S. Anderson

Impeachment Inquiry Against President Donald J. Trump

Prologue: There is a “listening room” in The White  House where presidents make their phone calls.  The day after Special Counsel Robert Mueller testified publicly under oath at a televised news conference on May 30, 2019,  President Donald Trump made a call to President Volodymyr Zelensky of Ukraine.

Trump had rejoiced and boasted when Attorney General Barr had given his four page biased interpretation of The Mueller Report and said, “No collusion!”  Barr had neglected to cite the ten specific examples of “Obstruction of Justice” that were in the 400 page report.

When Trump made the call, he had already put a hold on money that Congress had approved for Ukraine.  The funds were desperately needed to buy Javelin missiles as defense against Russian tanks.  Russia had already annexed Crimea on their southern border.  During the phone call,  Trump asked Zelensky “for a favor, ” He asked him to help his personal lawyer, and the Attorney General who would be coming to visit Ukraine. Their purpose was to investigate Joe Biden and his son, Hunter to find illegal activities they had taken part in.  It was a clear ‘quid pro quo’ against his main political rival in the 2020 presidential race.

By the time the thirty minute phone call was over,  White  House aides were alarmed by what they had heard after Trump had congratulated Zelensky on his election. Secretary of State Mike Pompeo had also been in the room.  A decision was made to “lock down” records of the call , a process that has occurred since Trump was elected in 2016.   This removed the call to a separate electronic system reserved for classified information.

Enter The Whistle Blower:  A C.I.A official who had once worked in the White House learned of what had occurred with the phone call.  He (or she) wrote a complaint that was declassified and given to The House Intelligence Committee.  “The White House officials who gave me this information were deeply disturbed by what happened in the phone call.  They told me there was already a discussion going with White House lawyers because in the likelihood, in the officials retelling , that they had witnessed the president abuse his office for personal gain. “

Friday, September 27, 2019, The New York Times : COMPLAINT ASSERTS A WHITE HOUSE COVER-UP

President Trump was in New York at The United Nations when the whistle-blower story broke.  He spoke at the  U. S. Mission to The United Nations.  Trump immediately wanted to know who provided information to the whistle-blower, saying whoever did so was “close to a spy” .And “in the old days” spies were dealt with differently. ( When his response was shown later on TV , it was interpreted  as “ they were “executed.” )  He also condemned the news media as “crooked” for reporting on the complaint.

For the record: The Whistle Blower Protection Act was passed by Congress in 1989 .  It protects whistle blowers who report activities that violate laws, rules and regulations in government as well as business and industry.

By October 3rd,  the president on the White  House Lawn called on China to join Ukraine to “investigate Joseph Biden and his son Hunter for illegal activities”.  He called them “crooked” earning millions  in China.  His similar comments about them in Ukraine have been debunked on television by reporters who followed up on the charges .  When  Joe Biden spoke to a crowd the same day, he said, “I’m not going anywhere!  I never made a dime in China.  And I resent him attacking my family!  The crowd responded with loud cheers.  The president has also targeted Adam Schiff, Chair of The House Intelligence Committee since he received the complaint from the whistle-blower.  An avalanche of tweets accused Schiff of being a “traitor”.

 On Wednesday, September 25, 2019, The New York Times  had run a full page headline: “PELOSI WILL OPEN FORMAL IMPEACHMENT INQUIRY, ACCUSING PRESIDENT OF ‘BETRAYAL OF THE NATION”.  A growing number of Democratic members of The House of Representatives had been urging her to make this decision.  Leading House committees were already holding hearings:  Judiciary, Intelligence, Oversight and Ways & Means.   As Speaker of The House, she had waited until a majority of the members were behind Impeachment.   There was also strong support from leading Democrats running for President in the 20/20 Election.

Framing Articles of Impeachment: The current uproar over Trump asking Ukraine and China to investigate Joe Biden and his son is the last in a series of presidential abuses of power.  Historians have cautioned that articles of impeachment should include harmful actions he has taken since he became president rather than focus only on this latest scandal.

The three charges against President Richard Nixon would be appropriate for Donald J. Trump:  Abuse of Power,  Obstruction of Justice and Contempt of Congress.  His current actions could be first among many Abuses of Power. Next, The Mueller Report details ten clear examples of Obstruction of Justice.  Last, Contempt of Congress would stress Trump’s instructions to everyone in the Executive branch to ignore subpoenas from the different Congressional committees.

Donald Trump has never displayed knowledge of The Constitution of The United States. ( He thought there were 12 Articles. ) He has never realized that The Founders placed The Legislature first as Article I, rather than The Executive branch of government because they fought King George during the Revolution to create this nation.  They feared another despot at the helm.  They created the system of checks and balances to make sure the Executive did not become another despot.  Congress controls the “power of the purse” among other important powers.

Donald Trump in his remarks on October 3 made clear that he will do and say whatever he wants to remain in office and win the election in 2020.  He appeared to be daring the Democrats, “Impeach me! “  The House of Representatives where they hold the majority may do just that.

It is hoped that the Republican Senators who will decide Donald Trump’s fate in a trial will think about the founders of this nation as well as their seat in D.C. when they vote.  The future of this nation as the leader of the free world is at stake.

………………………………………………………….Joyce S. Anderson